Mellon Square

Mellon Square Renovated




Mellon SquareThe Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy has carried out a complete revitalizion of Mellon Square. The restoration began in 2009 when the Parks Conservancy engaged Heritage Landscapes to develop a comprehensive plan for the Square.
Mellon SquareThe park’s original design is the work of Mitchell & Ritchey and Simonds & Simonds who created a conspicuously geometric space with prominent fountains, planters and benches. This comprehensive plan structures the preservation, revitalization, interpretation and management into the future.
Mellon SquareThe renovation, led by Patricia O’Donnell of Heritage Landscapes. Specifically, the restoration plan:

  • Created 15% more public space by adding a new terrace area overlooking Smithfield Street;
  • Refurbished the Square’s signature bronze fountains back to their original design;

Mellon Square

  • Reinstalled dramatic nighttime lighting;
  • Replanted the Square according to the original design intent while using the best and most appropriate contemporary plant selections. To protect the investment that has been made in restoring Mellon Square, the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy has established a permanent maintenance and management fund.

Mellon SquareAn operating agreement with the City of Pittsburgh gives the Parks Conservancy a significant role in the stewardship and operation of the space. With this commitment, the beauty of a treasured landscape will be enjoyed by Pittsburghers for years to come.

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2 thoughts on “Mellon Square Renovated”

  1. I’m rather surprised by recent urban park programs instilling
    a maximum mix of “hard” and soft” scape. I know that you want transition according to elevation change; to direct pedestrian flow and provide “nodes” for meeting but I don’t see the design layouts’ leaning toward …”nodes of quiet contemplation with a more natural landscape”. I guess I’m just stuck in a ‘less is more’ ethic.
    I see too much of a “Disneyfied” theme that every square inch
    of space must inhibit a function; a dedication of a meaning which is already elementarily evident…there’s no surprise there!
    Is there?

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