Keemala Resort

Keemala resort




Keemala Resort
Keemala Overview – Photo © Brent Madison

Keemala’s design blends the indigenous stories of Phuket’s four fictitious clans with the decadence of an upscale resort. The architecture is a stark contrast to most hotel accommodation, and is designed by Thailand based talent Architect Space.

Keemala Resort
Keemala entrance- Photo © Brent Madison

Pisit Aongskultong from Pisud Design Company has designed the interiors and is managing the creative vision of the resort. Keemala’s fantastic cottages, tree houses and pool villas are designed around the unique topographical conditions. Set into the hillside and making use of slopes offering sea views, streams, waterfalls and indigenous trees.

Keemala Resort
Tree Pool House- Photo © Brent Madison

Design Concept
Keemala utilizes the natural surroundings as inspiration and a base to innovate a totally different hotel accommodation type for Phuket and Thailand. Design concepts focus on the tales of 4 fictitious different tribes that united to form a village called Keemala.

Keemala Resort
Keemala Pods- Photo © Brent Madison

The overall design leverages on two major components: nature and culture. The majority of the building materials are natural products, and resources found on site have been recycled. Materials also use artificial products that have natural forms (or partly made of natural product).

Keemala Resort
Tree Pool House- Photo © Brent Madison

Wherever possible the design is environmentally sustainable and the construction complements the surrounding ecosystem rather than demolish and create a man made surrounding. As a result the residences, public areas, bridge, path and sculpture are inspired from nature e.g. forms of flowers, bird’s nests and symbolizing the items of the local people’s way of life e.g. vibrant colors, natural fabrics, and earthiness.

Keemala Resort
Tree Pool House- Photo © Brent Madison

Landscape design
The focus is on the concept of ‘life’ and ‘village’ design that provides simple and peaceful vicinity which leading to healthy environment. By complementing present nature, existing topography and trees are kept to their original conditions.

Keemala Resort
Clay Pool Cottage- Photo © Brent Madison

Layout of the project in overall is designed to be a valley village that provides privacy in zoning arrangement. Plantations are mainly food plants such as fruits, vegetables and local herbs in which there are no chemical involved in growing process. Furthermore, the tribes culture can be found everywhere in hardscape design to reflect the concept of ‘life’.

Keemala Resort
Tent Pool Villa- Photo © Brent Madison

Interior design
The interior design is based on the beliefs of 4 fictitious tribes as follows:
1. Clay Pool Cottage – It is believed that people of this tribe excel in agriculture and have a strong bond to earth. This inspires the design such that the interior is made of clay and dirt, the furniture are made of wood and other natural materials. Unique pattern is imprinted to tell the tale of this art and culture of the ‘Pa-Ta-Pea’ clan.

Keemala Resort
Bird Nest Pool Villa- Photo © Brent Madison

2. Tree Pool House – The seven two-storey ‘Tree Pool Houses’ are built to represent the ‘We-Ha’ people who worshipped the universe and chose to live suspended from the trees to be nearer to the sky. The interior design reflects this belief and therefore, hanging furniture with embedded unique pattern can be found in this house and are complete with a private pool.

Keemala Resort
Bird Nest Pool Villa- Photo © Brent Madison

3. Tent Pool Villa – The ‘Khon-Jorn Clan’ (Wanderer Clan) were an adventurous group consisting of foragers, herders, performers, traders and explorers, who spent their time trading goods with other tribes they encountered on their journeys. This inspires the design to be made of fabrics and canvasses that reflects ease of mobility and their nomadic instincts. Inside the Tent Pool Villas you will see the forms of wildlife and textures have inspired the interiors, materials were also chosen to highlight their pursuant lifestyle.

Keemala Resort
Keemala Pool- Photo © Brent Madison

4. Bird Nest Pool Villa – The ‘Rung-Nok’ community enjoyed an opulent way of life compared to other clans. They excel in reading the movement of the stars and they are into luxurious lifestyle. The interior design reflects this belief by introducing multi-color and luxurious design together. Interior design in public areas is focused on blending these 4 types characteristic together to represent their mutual relationship and unity. However, functionality of each area is considered and completely provided. Source by Keemala.

Keemala Resort
Mala Spa- Photo © Brent Madison

Location: Phuket, Thailand
Architects: Architect Space
Interior design: Pisud Design Company
Client: Keemala Phuket
Year: 2015
Photographs: Brent Madison, Courtesy of Keemala Phuket

Keemala Resort
Mala Spa- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Keemala Enchanted Hall- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Keemala Su Tha Bar- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Keemala Su Tha Restaurant- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Clay Pool Cottage- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Clay Pool Cottage- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Clay Pool Cottage- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Bird Nest Pool Villa- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Bird Nest Pool Villa- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Tree Pool House- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Tree Pool House- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Tent Pool Villa- Photo © Brent Madison
Keemala Resort
Tent Pool Villa- Photo © Brent Madison

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One thought on “Keemala resort”

  1. These are some pretty spectacular resorts. Part of me wonders how a man could design something like this. I guess some people just have a special skill for that type of thing. I’d actually love to meet a resort designer some day. It might be cool to see how they come up with their ideas.

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