The Pont de Sèvres Towers – Citylights by Dominique Perrault

Citylights

The Pont de Sèvres Towers
The Pont de Sèvres Towers architects Badani and Roux-Dorlut Photo © Badani et Roux-Dorlut

The Pont de Sèvres Towers, renamed Citylights following a complete re-structuring, were built in 1975 by architects Badani and Roux-Dorlut. The project we conducted is a renovation, re-structuring and an unveiling of the towers’ self-evident resources. The site is now very well connected to the public transport system, with a métro stop right outside the building, and the Grand Paris network. The towers are therefore an integral part of Paris’s recent expansion towards Grand Paris. In addition to their strong territorial impact, these elements have transformed the buildings’ morphology and mutation.

Citylights
Photo © André Morin

An open, sheltered campus
We conceived a range of spaces in order to open the project to the outside: a large plaza in front of the towers, passageways on the sides, and gardens. The project is now physically anchored in the city. The 53,000 square feet space that was created on the ground level connects the towers to their environment and roots them into the urban space of the city. With the reception areas, walkways and communal spaces, we are offering a new type of work environment, fit for today’s world.

Citylights
Photo © André Morin

An unveiling process
These projects possess undeniable design and geometrical qualities. The hexagonal floor plan, for instance, with its central core serving floors of offices, offers 360° views of Paris and its Western suburbs. All of the work spaces receive direct daylight, and the open offices are narrow so that no more than twelve people are ever visible from any given point. The architecture of the buildings is denser than it would be, had they been conceived nowadays. Our goal with this project therefore consisted in unveiling these assets.

Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon

With their prism-like shapes, the buildings are very efficient when it comes to capturing light. Just like with optical instruments, the traditional opposition between the north and south faces of the buildings no longer applies. Sunlight shines throughout the buildings and reflects on the crystallized facades so that all offices can benefit from it, whichever face of the building they are on. This urban complex forms a prow at the entrance of the city of Boulogne, which can be seen from the highway down the hill of Meudon.

Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon

The rehabilitation process of the Pont de Sèvres Towers, while respecting their historic value, allowed for a thoroughly new structure, in line with current norms and new sustainable development performances. The name Citylights, chosen by the project management, is a perfect description of the gleaming “bracelets” of the buildings, whose lighting will be specially conceived to make them shine bright in the night sky. Light gleams on every level of the towers, in the work spaces, dining areas, auditorium and on the campus which opens out to the city below. Citylights is a luminous tower, a beacon into the city in which it is now anchored.

Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon

The central hall: a sheltered outdoor space
The central hall, or agora, is a theatrical stage, with platforms, aisles and balconies. This generous space, filled with light on both sides, provides a unified physical address for the different towers, and acts as a compass to orientate visitors and employees. The interior design of this immense space reflects the architect’s stance: this Agora does not create a border between the outside and the inside, as façades flow seamlessly into the buildings. The duotonal color palette of the Agora plays with nuances of black and white. The floors, the stair risers and the suspended metallic mesh come in different shades of grey.

Citylights
Photo © Dominique Perrault Architecture /Adagp

The metallic mesh
We first chose to take metallic mesh away from its industrial purpose to introduce it into architectural projects with our work on the French national library (Bibliothèque nationale de France). It felt natural to us to use it for the Agora too. Just like a piece of clothing, the metal is woven on a bespoke basis: for Citylights, we designed the mesh, the stitch details, the finish… To create this unique metallic mesh for the Agora, we worked on a very large scale with 26-foot strips and invisible match. The width of the mesh embraces the hall, turning it into a generous, welcoming space.

Citylights
Photo © André Morin

The Albatross chandelier
The large Albatross chandelier is made up of 14 birds, with a 20-foot wingspan each. These large elements are set at different angles on a horizontal line so as to replicate the flight pattern of a flock of birds. The mix of curves and counter-curves required several sketches and models. Finally, we built one prototype on a 1:1 ratio, in the same material, to check on the light and the wingspan; and another one to check on the number of fittings as well as their size and quality. The movement of the birds depends on the weight of the metal itself, while a feeling of lightness is produced by the diffraction of light on the chandelier.

Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon

A flock of birds was not our first idea. It only came about when we determined that the lighting should use large elements in order to multiply reflections. To make the most of the light that bounces between the ceiling and the metallic floors and increase this luminous effect even more, we imagined wide metal sails with indirect lighting. These large curves brought to mind a flock of albatross, and the notions of freedom, travel, fluidity and generosity that these birds symbolise. Wherever you stand in the Agora, the installation never looks the same. I hope these albatross will conjure up many dreams…

Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon

The importance of light
Natural light brings architecture to life, while artificial light plays the same role indoors, as part of the finishing process. We use light to transform the spaces we create. The lighting you need to read a book or to work on a computer is dramatically different for the lighting you need to move through a building. Source by Dominique Perrault Architect.

Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon

Location: 204, rond point du pont de Sèvres, Boulogne-Billancourt, France
Architects: Dominique Perrault Architect
Architect of execution: Artelia
Consultants: EGIS (structure and MEP), EPPAG (facade), AVLS (acoustic), AADT (safety), Socotec (control), Gaëlle Lauriot-Prévost (design of the main central hall), Didier Gomez (decoration of services areas)
Area site: 20 000 m2
Built area: 85 400 m2 – including 75 000 m2 of renovation and 10 400 m2 of extension – construction of a new tower (4th petal) and new building base.
Tower City: 1 34 000 m2 Tower City 2 30 000 m2 Including 4th petal onstruction 6 000 m2 Tower City 3 17 000 m2
Year: inauguration March 2016
Photographs: André Morin, Vincent Fillon, Badani et Roux-Dorlut, Dominique Perrault Architecture / Adagp, Courtesy of Dominique Perrault

Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Photo © Dominique Perrault Architecture /Adagp
Citylights
Photo © Dominique Perrault Architecture /Adagp
Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Photo © Vincent Fillon
Citylights
Site
Citylights
Site Plan
Citylights
Second Floor Plan
Citylights
Axonometry
Citylights
Section

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *