Next opening New Tate Modern by Herzog & de Meuron

New Tate Modern
New Tate Modern
Photo © © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron

Tate Modern revealed plans for entirely new collection displays, 75% of which will have been acquired since 2000, opening on 17 June 2016. The new displays will demonstrate how the collection has been transformed since Tate Modern first opened. The world’s most popular gallery of modern art will be even more international, diverse and engaging, with works by over 300 artists from around the world, with works by Mark Rothko, Agnes Martin and Henri Matisse joining new acquisitions from Latin America, Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, including Meschac Gaba, Sheela Gowda and Cildo Meireles.

New Tate Modern
Photo © © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron

The impact it has had on urban design and the development of the South Bank and Southwark, has been as substantial as its influence on the city’s artistic, cultural and social life. The new development will add another decisive dimension to the architecture and environment of this quarter and beyond. With a new entrance to The South, and a direct north-south passage, taking people from the Thames through the existing building and the Turbine Hall out to a new city plaza to the south on Sumner Street and from there on to Southwark, the development will connect Southwark with the Thames and provide much improved open, public space.

New Tate Modern
Photo © Tate 2

The clover-shaped dramatic subterranean oil tanks are at the heart of these plans and they are a point of departure for the new building. When we converted the power station we dug out the Turbine Hall in order to turn the vast physical dimensions of the existing structure into a tangible reality. Here, the Oil Tanks form the foundation of the building as the new volume develops and rises out of the structure below. They are not merely the physical foundation of the new building, but also the starting point for intellectual and curatorial approaches which have changed to meet the needs of a contemporary museum at the beginning of the 21st century.

New Tate Modern
Image © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron

These approaches require a range of gallery spaces, both larger and smaller, along with ‘As Found’ spaces of less conventional shape, and better facilities for the gallery’s popular learning programmes. As well as doubling the gallery space, The Tate Modern Project will create a diverse collection of public spaces dedicated to relaxation and reflection, making and doing, group learning and private study. These spaces are spread over the building and linked by a generous public circulation system rising through the building.

New Tate Modern
Image © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron

The vertical orientation of these spaces is clear in the same way that a horizontal orientation is evident in the first phase of the Tate Modern. At the same time we felt it was important for the building to be visible from The North. As one approaches Tate Modern from the river, it can be seen rising behind the power station without competing with the iconic chimney. Integrating the new building into the existing has been fundamental to the project, as well as integrating it into the skyline of the city and ensuring that visitors both inside and out could orient themselves.

New Tate Modern
Image © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron

We wanted the combined elements of Tate Modern, old and new, to be expressed as a whole, to have them come together and function as a single organism. Using the same base palette of bricks and brickwork in a radical new way, we created a perforated brick screen through which light filters in the day and through which the building will glow at night. The brickwork also reacts to the inclined faces of the form by stepping to approximate the pure geometry. With both of these simple actions, texture and perforation, the brickwork is transformed from a solid and massive material to a veil that covers the concrete skeleton of the new building.

New Tate Modern
Image © Peter Saville. Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron

The façade changes in appearance depending on the observer’s point of view, not just from transparent to opaque, but also in pattern and orientation. This continuous wrap of perforated brickwork is broken through the introduction of horizontal cuts to allow for views out and to provide for daylight and natural ventilation to the internal spaces. The location of these ‘cuts’ is in direct relation to the internal programming and planning of the building. The result is a new yet symbiotic reading that is distinct and unique along the skyline of London. Source by Herzog & de Meuron and Tate Modern.

New Tate Modern
Marvin Gaye Chetwynd – Hermitos Children
  • Location: London, UK
  • Architects: Herzog & de Meuron
  • Partners: Jacques Herzog, Pierre de Meuron, Ascan Mergenthaler (Partner in Charge)
  • Project Team: Ben Duckworth (Associate, Project Director), John O’Mara (Associate, Project Manager), Christoph Zeller (Project Architect), Donald Matheson (Project Manager), WimWalschap (Associate) Abdulfatah Adan, Roman Aebi (Workshop), Israel Alvarez Matamoros, Renata Arpagaus, Jayne Barlow, Michael Bekker, Ann Bertholdt, Abel Blancas, MarinkeBoehm, Frederik Bojesen, Emi Bryan, CatrionaCantwell, Michael Casey (Associate), Mark Chan, Oliver Cooke, Massimo Corradi, Corinne Curk, Dorothee Dietz, Gemma Douglas, Corina Ebeling, Martin Eriksson, Francis Fawcett, Elizabeth Ferguson, Francisco de Freitas, Thomas von Girsewald, Harry Gugger (Partner), Volker Helm, Arnaldo Hernandez, PasqualHerrero, Lela Herrling, DaisukeHirabayashi, Dara Huang, KasiaJackowska, Sofia Chinita Janeiro, Sara JardimManteigas, Simon Johnson, Jihoon Kim, YuichiKodai, PawelKrzeminski, TomoyukiKurokawa, Alexandre Massé, Olivier Meystre, KwaminaMonney, Cynthia Morales Castillo, Ingrid MoyeVerduzco, Martin Nässén, Dominik Nüssen, Mónica Ors Romagosa, Chi Won Park, Dirk Peters, Callum Pirie, James Pockson, Maki PortillaKawamura, Tanya Rainsley, Georg Rafailidis, Jan Andreas Reeg, Miguel del Rio Sanin, Rebecca Roberts, JeannineRoschi, Philipp Schaerer, ChasperSchmidlin, GünterSchwob (workshop), MónicaSedano Peralta, Lorenz Selim Lachauer, Jad Silvester, Karolina Slawecka, Iva Smrke, Henriette Spoerl, Peter Stec, Tom Stevens, Kai Strehlke (Head Digital Technologies), Heeri Song, SanjaTiedemann, Paul Vantieghem, Fabio Verardo, Christian Voss, Marta Yebra, Camia Young, Claudia Zipperle, Christian Zöllner
  • Client: Tate Trustees, London, UK
  • Client Representative: GTMS, London, UK
  • Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Hayes Davidson. Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron and Tate Modern
New Tate Modern
Tania Bruguera – Tatlin’s Whispwe #5
New Tate Modern
Liberty leading the people © Alexandra Pirici
New Tate Modern
Apichatpong Weerasethakul Primitive
New Tate Modern
Séance de Shadow © Dominique Gonzalez‐Foerster
New Tate Modern
The Reverse Sessions 5
New Tate Modern
Robert Morris Untitled
New Tate Modern
Charlotte Posenenske – Prototype for Revolving Vane

 

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